Matthew Foster, Andrew H. Lyons, & David Sedgwick of “The Club”

Australian Made Entertainment presents The ClubThis episode serves as both a “welcome back!” and a fond “farewell” to the excellent company Australian Made Entertainment (previously heard on the podcast with their wonderful shows Speaking in Tongues and We Used to Live Here), who are presenting their last show in NYC before founders Kathleen & Matthew Foster bring their family & work to Los Angeles. West Coast, our loss is your gain.

Fittingly for their final NYC bow, AME is presenting an Aussie classic, David Williamson’s The Club, about the back-room negotiations and maneuverings of a football club in the 1970s, directed by Andrew H. Lyons. As noted in the interview, it feels like this play occupies an interesting spot between Glengarry Glen Ross and Moneyball—and don’t worry, you don’t have to know a thing about business, or Australian football, to enjoy the brilliant work going on right now at Urban Stages.

Listen in as Matthew, Andrew, and actor David Sedgwick discuss the struggles between tradition and business, moustaches, and how a contemporary Australian classic resonates in modern-day U.S.A.

“…what I saw getting into it was this tipping point of tradition vs. business, bottom-line vs. tradition…that’s where we were, we were right there at ‘do we hang on to tradition, do we keep America moving forward to help ourselves, or do we cut our losses, cut all that stuff, and go for the money‘…it’s the moment of the tipping point…”

Australian Made Entertainment presents

The Club

by David Williamson
directed by Andrew H. Lyons

thru September 27, 2014
Wednesdays to Saturdays @ 8 p.m.
Sundays @ 2 p.m.

Urban Stages
259 W. 30th Street
Manhattan

tickets: $18 ($10 on Wednesdays!), available via BrownPaperTickets

Australian Made Entertainment presents The Club Australian Made Entertainment presents The Club Australian Made Entertainment presents The Club Australian Made Entertainment presents The Club

photos by Samir Abady

Nick Abeel, Kelsey Didion, Kyle Schaefer, and Kristin McCarthy Parker of “Hold On To Your Butts”

Hold On To Your Butts at The PITImitation is the sincerest form of flattery.

But in the case of Hold On To Your Butts, this isn’t straight imitation—while yes, it is a shot-for-shot live remake of elementary-school-you’s favorite movie (at least, elementary-school-me), it’s a madcap comic theatrical homage full of creativity, nostalgia (in the best of ways), and excitement. The team of director Kristin McCarthy Parker, actors Nick Abeel and Kyle Schaefer, and sound/foley artist Kelsey Didion, have recreated the sense of wonder and just plain FUN that you had when you first saw Jurassic Park back in 1994.

They’re sharing that magic with you at The PIT for just three more performances from when I post this, so don’t delay. It’s the kind of show that, if you don’t catch it, all your friends who did are going to be admonishing you for years to come, saying, “aw, man, I can’t believe you didn’t see that!” So take this podcast’s name to heart, and go see this show.

At the very least, listen in to this episode as Nick, Kyle, Kelsey, and Kristin discuss inspiration over beers, why Jurassic Park is the best movie of all time, and when the idea is just stupid enough that everyone in the room gives it a “YES.”

“…we found out that our happy place in terms of performance is where we’re doing something really stupid, but we’re really committed to it…really dumb, but really committed…”

Hold On To Your Butts

created by Nick Abeel, Kelsey Didion, Kyle Schaefer, and Kristin McCarthy Parker
directed by Kristin McCarthy Parker

featuring Nick Abeel & Kyle Schaefer
sound/live foley by Kelsey Didion

remaining performances
Saturday, September 20 @ 11PM
Monday, September 22 @ 9:30PM
Tuesday, September 23 @ 7PM

The PIT
123 E. 24th Street
Manhattan

Hold On To Your Butts at The PIT Hold On To Your Butts at The PIT Hold On To Your Butts at The PIT Hold On To Your Butts at The PIT

Barry Rowell, Ralph Lewis, Catherine Porter, Donald Warfield, and Ben Nemser of “3Christs”

Peculiar Works presents 3 Christs, photo © 2014 Jim R Moore / VaudevisualsStudents of the sordid history of psychological treatment might be aware of social psychologist Milton Rokeach’s experiment, chronicled in his book The Three Christs of Ypsilanti, to lessen the delusions of three paranoid schizophrenic patients who all believed themselves to be Jesus Christ—by putting them in close contact and encouraging them to confront their conflicting statuses as the Christ.

Ethically questionable, to say the least, but it proves fascinating source material for Peculiar Works Project to mine for their new site-specific show 3Christs, presented, appropriately, at Judson Memorial Church.

Listen in as co-creators Barry Rowell & Ralph Lewis, actors Catherine Porter & Donald Warfield, and magic consultant Ben Nemser, discuss belief, site-specificity, the messy history of treating mental illness, magic tricks, and how to play crazy without stepping on everyone else’s crazy.

“…this is not a play about religion at all, it’s a play about belief, and what we believe in…”

Peculiar Works Project presents

3Christs

by SM Dale and Barry Rowell
based on The Three Christs of Ypsilanti, a psychological study by Milton Rokeach
directed by Kelly O’Donnell

September 11–28
Thursdays–Sundays
all performances @ 7PM

Judson Memorial Church
55 Washington Square South
Manhattan

tickets: $18 ($12 students/seniors), available via OvationTix

Peculiar Works presents 3 Christs, photo © 2014 Jim R Moore / Vaudevisuals Peculiar Works presents 3 Christs, photo © 2014 Jim R Moore / Vaudevisuals Peculiar Works presents 3 Christs, photo © 2014 Jim R Moore / Vaudevisuals Peculiar Works presents 3 Christs, photo © 2014 Jim R Moore / Vaudevisualsphotos © 2014 Jim R Moore / Vaudevisuals

 

Lori Wolter Hudson, adapter/director, and David Hudson, actor, of “Drunkle Vanya”

Three Day Hangover presents Drunkle VanyaTake one part Chekhov, two parts drinking game, one part party, add a dash of improv, and you’ve got a recipe for fun, boozy theatre in a bar the way only Three Day Hangover can do it.

When you love Chekhov the way adapter/director Lori Wolter Hudson does, contemporizing Uncle Vanya for a New York bar audience must be equally thrilling and daunting; if the experience of this podcaster (who typically loathes Chekhov) is any indication, she’s got a hell of a lot to be proud of. The podcast doesn’t editorialize, as I always say — but you’d do well to take this episode at its word, and go see this show.

Listen in as Lori, along with fellow Hangover-er (and portrayer of Astrov in the show) David Hudson, discuss the element of randomness, playing games, the difference between original scripts and what actually ends up on stage, structure around improv, and how to make Chekhov fun (in a bar).

Будем здоровы!

“Hell yeah, I wanna do Chekhov in a bar on the Upper West Side!”

Three Day Hangover presents

Drunkle Vanya

based on Uncle Vanya, by Anton Chekhov
adapted & directed by Lori Wolter Hudson

remaining performances; all shows 8pm
Monday, September 15
Tuesday, September 16
Wednesday, September 17
Thursday, September 18

The Gin Mill
442 Amsterdam Avenue (bet. 81st and 82nd Streets)
Manhattan

tickets: $15, available via BrownPaperTickets

Three Day Hangover presents Drunkle Vanya, photo by Lloyd MulveyThree Day Hangover presents Drunkle Vanya, photo by Lloyd Mulvey Three Day Hangover presents Drunkle Vanya, photo by Lloyd Mulvey Three Day Hangover presents Drunkle Vanya, photo by Lloyd Mulvey Three Day Hangover presents Drunkle Vanya, photo by Lloyd Mulvey

photos by Lloyd Mulvey

Estefanía Fadul & Matthew Paul Olmos of “Así van los fantasmas de México, primera parte”

Repertorio Español presents Así van los fantasmas de México, primera parte, written by Matthew Paul Olmos, directed by Estefanía FadulIn 2009, in the town of Praxedis G. Guerrero, Chihuahua, México, the police chief was tortured and beheaded, a victim of the drug cartels. A year later, with all but three of the town’s police officers having quit, Marisol Valles García, a 20-year-old woman working on a criminology degree, was the only person willing to step up and take on the job of police chief.

García’s bravery was an international news story, and became a central element of Matthew Paul Olmos‘s play So Go the Ghosts of Mexico, part one, presented at La Mama last year. This season, the play returns, but in a Spanish language translation by Bernardo Cubria at Repertorio Español, now entitled Así van los fantasmas de México, primera parte and directed by Estefanía Fadul.

And while García’s story provided the inspiration for the play, the production is much more than a biopic — vengeful ghosts, an invisible child, and a magic car stereo help to create a powerful piece that is less an historical telling, and more a theatrical meditation on action and consequence in the midst of the drug wars on the U.S.-Mexico border.

Listen in to this episode of the podcast as Estefanía and Matthew discuss the effects of translating the play into the language of the other side of the border, who the audience is, magical realism, and how you integrate sound as the sixth character in your five-actor play.

“…it’s really fascinating to see it translated…there’s a certain fluidity to it in Spanish…there might be something interesting about having the original writing from a perspective of an American, now being told from, it feels like, more the Mexican side — maybe there’s some sort of balance that gets found in that…”

Repertorio Español presents

Así van los fantasmas de México, primera parte

written by Matthew Paul Olmos
translated by Bernardo Cubria
directed by Estefanía Fadul

performed in Spanish, with live English translation available

one remaining performance!
Sunday, August 31, 2014 @6:30PM

Repertorio Español
138 East 27th Street
Manhattan

tickets: $12, available via Repertorio.org

Repertorio Español presents Así van los fantasmas de México, primera parte, written by Matthew Paul Olmos, directed by Estefanía Fadul Repertorio Español presents Así van los fantasmas de México, primera parte, written by Matthew Paul Olmos, directed by Estefanía Fadul Repertorio Español presents Así van los fantasmas de México, primera parte, written by Matthew Paul Olmos, directed by Estefanía Fadul Repertorio Español presents Así van los fantasmas de México, primera parte, written by Matthew Paul Olmos, directed by Estefanía Fadulphotos by Michael J. Palma

 

Ashley Jacobson, Elizabeth Sarkady, Ryan Guess, Dondrie Burnham, and Brett Epstein of “The Tunnel Play”

The Dirty Blondes present The Tunnel PlayWelcome back to The Dirty Blondes, playwright Ashley Jacobson and producer Elizabeth Sarkady, and to Mr. Brett Epstein (his third appearance on the podcast)! They’re joined by fellow actors Ryan Guess and Dondrie Burnham (both of whom I hope will also become repeat-guests here on the podcast) to talk about their new show, currently playing in The Fringe.

Around a moveable set of three trunks, The Tunnel Play follows a young woman who gave up her comfortable life to live in the tunnels, her older friend (and tunnel-life mentor) who landed in the tunnels through hardship, and a self-loathing yuppie copywriter, as their lives set on a collision course just ahead of a massive weather event to hit New York City. What do you do when faced with the possibility that everything could be washed away at any moment?

Listen in as Ashley, Ryan, Dondrie, Brett, and Elizabeth discuss that scary, difficult question, as well as having to answer to someone, taking inspiration from Superstorm Sandy, and the things we bottle up (until the lid blows off).

“…life is a storm, and storms affect everybody, and your actions also affect everybody…”

The Dirty Blondes present

The Tunnel Play

written by Ashley Jacobson
directed by Courtney Laine Self

Fringe Venue #10: The Kraine Theater
85 East 4th Street
Manhattan

Sat, Aug 9 @ 4:45PM
Tue, Aug 12 @ 8:15PM

Sat, Aug 16 @ 8:15PM
Tue, Aug 19 @ 4:45PM
Thu, Aug 21 @ 9:45PM

tickets available via FringeNYC.org

The Dirty Blondes present The Tunnel Play, photo by Justin Hoch The Dirty Blondes present The Tunnel Play, photo by Justin Hoch The Dirty Blondes present The Tunnel Play, photo by Justin Hoch The Dirty Blondes present The Tunnel Play, photo by Justin Hoch

photos by Justin Hoch

Lizzy Beth Elkins, Kathy Huynh-Phan, Peter J. Wallace, and Drew Nungesser of “The Anger in Ernest & Ernestine”

"The Anger in Ernest and Ernestine"What do you do when you’re graduating from a respected, traditional acting program, and you make your own theatre company?

If you’re actors Peter J. Wallace and Kathy Huynh-Phan and sound designer Drew Nungesser, you do a clown show in The Fringe. And you get the awesome Lizzy Beth Elkins to direct it.

Listen in as Lizzy, Peter, Kathy and Drew discuss directors auditioning for actors, clowning, Al Gore & the internet, and welcoming your sound designer into the rehearsal room. Plus, suspenders are snapped, live, on-air.

“…part of what I’m attracted to for theatre is, let’s see if we can be truthful and tell great stories, but then also kind of make it a party…”

The Plinth presents

The Anger in Ernest & Ernestine

written by Robert Morgan, Martha Ross, and Leah Cherniak
directed by Lizzy Beth Elkins

Sat Aug 9th 2:45pm
Tue Aug 12th 5:30pm

Fri Aug 15th 9:30pm
Sun Aug 17th 7:30pm
Thur Aug 21st 3:00pm

NY Fringe Venue #1: Teatro SEA
107 Suffolk St.
Manhattan

tickets available via FringeNYC.org

"The Anger in Ernest and Ernestine" "The Anger in Ernest and Ernestine" "The Anger in Ernest and Ernestine"photos by Banun Atina Idris

Sylvia Milo, playwright & performer, & Nathan Davis, composer, of “The Other Mozart”

The Other Mozart by Sylvia MiloHistory, as we know, is always changing—it’s written by those in power, but power shifts. So as some of the bullshit of European patriarchy is shoveled away, it’s amazing what can be learned; for example, did you know that none of Mozart’s music survived?

…no, not Wolfgang Amadeus, we’ve got tons of his music, catalogued with it’s own fancy system. Here, we’re talking of The Other Mozart, his sister, Nannerl, who by all accounts played & composed as brilliantly as her brother, though most people don’t know her story.

As a regular listener to Go See a Show! however, you may remember this story, because performer Sylvia Milo (now the show’s playwright as well) was first on the podcast way back on episode #10 with the first iteration of this project, then called Mozart’s Sister. This new piece presents the story in a brilliant new way (though that fabulous dress remains), and features more incredible music from composers Phyllis Chen and Nathan Davis, the later of whom joins Sylvia on the mic for this episode.

Plus, the new title feels like it puts Nannerl on equal footing with Wolfie. Where she rightfully belongs.

Listen in as Sylvia & Nathan discuss finding the right teacups, why it’s likely Nannerl called Wolfgang a “shit-eater,” and creating the music inside a 18th-century composer’s head.

The Little Matchstick Factory presents

The Other Mozart

by Sylvia Milo
directed by Isaac Byrne
music by Nathan Davis & Phyllis Chen

HERE Arts Center
145 Sixth Avenue
Manhattan

Previews: June 22*, 23, 24 @ 8:30PM
Opening Night: June 25 @ 8:30PM
June 26-28, July 1-3, 5, 8-12 @ 8:30PM
June 29, July 6 @ 4PM
Understudy: June 22, 28, July 5,12 @ 4PM & June 29, July 6 @ 8:30PM.

tickets: $30, available at the HERE Arts Center website

The Other Mozart by Sylvia Milo

portrait by Daniel Murtagh

The Other Mozart, by Sylvia MiloThe Other Mozart by Sylvia Milo

photos by Peter Griesser, DIVA Arts Collective

Stephen Brackett, Laura Ramadei, Jake Choi, Danelle Eliav, Max Jenkins, and Randall Newsome of “Carnival Kids”

Lesser America presents Carnival KidsTimes is tough all over. If you listen to NPR regularly (as this radio nerd does), you’ve probably caught a story or two just in the past week about young adults living with their parents because of economic pressures.

In Lucas Kavner’s new play Carnival Kids, directed by Stephen Brackett, Mark is living with his dad Dale again; but, the situation is reversed, and it’s broke, former rockstar Dale who’s crashing Mark’s New York law-student bachelor pad. As Dale befriends Mark’s illegal-smartphone-app mogul roommate, and attempts to profit from courting a woman seeking a green-card marriage, Mark attempts to open up to an old friend from high school — and his porcelain-smooth existence begins to crack.

My description can’t do it justice, so don’t let my ham-fisted-ness scare you off — this is a really interesting play in a production that deserves your attention.

Listen in as Stephen and the wonderful cast of Laura Ramadei, Jake Choi, Danelle Eliav, Max Jenkins, and Randall Newsome discuss hiding, breaking expectations, when casting director suggestions go wonderfully right, casting yourself (graciously), and how to invite the audience into the intense, bizarrely-close moments of the play.

“…we’re just naked up here on this stark white, thin set…I feel like I’m working on my poker face, trying not to lose it…”

Lesser America presents

Carnival Kids

by Lucas Kavner
directed by Stephen Brackett

TBG Theatre
312 W. 36th Street
Manhattan

thru June 28, 2014
Thursdays thru Saturdays
add’l performances on Sunday, June 15 & Wednesday, June 18
all performances 8PM

tickets available via SmartTix Lesser America presents Carnival KidsLesser America presents Carnival KidsLesser America presents Carnival Kids Lesser America presents Carnival Kids photos by Danny Ghitis

Aliza Shane, playwright and director of “Mein Uncle: An absurdist fairytale about the seeds of inhumanity”

3 Voices Theatre presents Aliza Shane's Mein UncleThe Brothers Grimm collected German folk stories which, through their efforts, have spread and become what many people will remember as classic fairy tales (like those re-imagined by StrangeDog in their show Enchanted Arms, which you may remember from the previous episode of this very podcast).

In this episode, playwright/director Aliza Shane, one of the co-founders of 3 Voices Theatre, takes the notion of the fairy tale back to Germany, and back in time to between the World Wars, on the eve of that nation’s darkest moment, in Mein Uncle: An absurdist fairytale about the seeds of inhumanity.

Listen in as Aliza discusses accidental inspiration via The History Channel, bad love, and what happens when you start a play with a girl in a cage.

“…with the absurdist fairytale, we get to divert from the history, we get to add a little oddness and bizarre twists and a little fairytale magic to an otherwise stiff, upsetting story…”

3 Voices Theatre presents

Mein Uncle: An absurdist fairytale about the seeds of inhumanity

written & directed by Aliza Shane

The Robert Moss Theater
440 Lafayette Street, 3rd Floor
Manhattan

through Sunday, June 8, 2014
Monday–Saturday @8PM (no show Tuesday)
Saturday & Sunday @2PM

tickets: $18 ($15 students/seniors), available via BrownPaperTickets

3 Voices Theatre presents Aliza Shane's Mein Uncle 3 Voices Theatre presents Aliza Shane's Mein Uncle 3 Voices Theatre presents Aliza Shane's Mein Uncle 3 Voices Theatre presents Aliza Shane's Mein Unclephotos by Jenn Tufaro